Knowledgebase: Articles
Collloidal-Minerals
Posted by Robert Redfern on 15 March 2014 11:29 AM

 

Colloidal Chemistry

Basically, colloidal chemistry is the science which converts elements into particles so minute that living plant cells can utilize them as an energy source, thereby stimulating the whole plant’s electro-magnetic system. All living cells emit electro-magnetic waves and the more waves the healthier the cell. These waves, the result of the phenomenon of electro-magnetic emission, are referred to as biophotons. An increase in the production of biophotons helps in what is termed Systemic Acquired Resistance [SAR] as the plant grows healthier and stronger and now has the ability to fight off pests and disease.

The heart of this new chemistry is the technology used to create a "colloidal micelle." This micelle is about the size of 10 hydrogen atoms, or one nanometer. Sub-microscopic particles are created in a microscopic field similar to a magnetic field. This chemistry has made possible the development and emergence of a variety of organic products, and is one of the 21st Century’s most promising advances in environmental science.

In the realm below 50 nanometers, the normal laws of physics no longer apply and we enter the world of quantum physics, where materials take on surprising new properties. Colors and physical appearance may change and some solid objects can even become invisible.

The major departure from traditional and conventional chemistry can be observed in the molecular reaction between the poles, for no longer does the normal attraction exist between positive and negative. Rather, it is between like poles. In other words, negative attracts negative and positive attracts positive. The micelle has a hydrophilic (water seeking) pole and a hydrophobic (water repelling) pole. The hydrophobic poles attract each other, thus forming the interior of the micelle. The hydrophilic poles form a tough outer surface. When a micelle comes in contact with a hydrocarbon molecule, the center of the micelle bonds to a similar hydrophobic hydrocarbon. The result is a disruption in the attraction to the other hydrocarbon molecules and/or to the surface. 

This action of a single micelle is multiplied by billions of other micelles, resulting in a process by which the molecules emulsify, which allows them to penetrate highly viscous and sticky materials, lifting them from the surface to which they are adhered. These nano-sized emulsions offer inherent advantages over conventional chemicals in reduced application rate, more rapid and reliable activation and extended long-term affect.

How it All Started

The origin of colloidal chemistry can be traced back to the 1880's, when it was evolved by David Graham, a British chemist. This discovery was so monumental that 50 years later one of the world's great scholars publicly enthused "There is, as I see it, just one great development left for our time. That is in the understanding of colloidal metals. It is the 'Fourth Estate of Matter', the other three being land, water and air." 

To gain a working conception of what colloidal chemistry is, consider that living tissues and organs are simply great masses of cells - billions of them. The energy, the very life-force of these cells, is obtained from certain minerals and metals contained within the human body. There are some 32 of them, including iron, iodine, manganese, and copper, with trace elements of many others. Colloidal chemistry is the science which converts those elements into particles so minute that they can be utilized by living cells.

A simple illustration will suggest the immense powers that are being unsealed. Suppose we have a cube of iron measuring an inch on each edge. The total surface would be six square inches. The electrical charge is on the surface; therefore, the greater the surface the greater the charge and if we divide the cube of iron into smaller pieces we increase the surface areas. By colloidal chemistry that iron cube can be divided into particles so minute that they are invisible, hence instead of six square inches of surface emanating electric energy, we have something like 127 acres.

The effect of colloids is explainable in part by electric action. Sick and dead and broken-down cells are attracted to the colloids by electro-magnetic force, as iron filings are attracted to a magnet. The colloids carry those decayed or poisonous substances into the blood stream, and they are eliminated, the system meanwhile adapting what it needs of the colloids. This effect was demonstrated by Dr. Stienmetz, the wizard of electricity, who devised a method of utilizing colloids in the treatment of sinus trouble.

Normally, nature supplies the cells with these elements in their colloidal form. Science has now learned to produce these colloids in the laboratory. "Lately, life has been prolonged by colloid action" revealed Dr. Frederick S. Macy, one of the country's outstanding bacteriologists, "and better knowledge of the subject will certainly result in prolonging the normal term of existence." By means of illustration, he told of a meeting of executives in an office in the RCA Building in New York City. He had shortly before rescued a withered yellow dead orchid from a pile of debris. He had added a teaspoonful of an amber-tinted liquid to a quart of water in which he inserted the flower. They were staring, incredulously, at a fresh and crisp purple orchid, blooming with vibrant colors and new life, which it had maintained for over two weeks. Here, he told the group of executives, was striking indication of the mysteries that lie ahead in that comparatively unexplored realm of science known as colloidal chemistry. 

In the case of the apparently dead orchid, copper in colloidal form was all that was needed to restore the proper balance of the minerals and metals that comprised the life cells of the flower. Once that balance was restored, the cells began to function and the orchid lived again. There were other examples he presented of this miraculous ability of colloids to alter conventional approaches to common problems. The Bide-a-Wee Home, New York's famous hospital for cats and dogs, reported curing mange in three days, where it used to take three months. A large Midwestern city was freed from the scourge of goiter when colloidal iodine was added to the water supply. A famous institution for the treatment of alcoholism was testing a colloidal solution, which apparently not only overcame the effects of excessive drinking but removed the craving for liquor as well. This treatment involved the introduction of metals - gold and iodine, in the case of alcoholism, to correct the unbalance caused by alcoholic poisons. 

Dr. Macy concluded his presentation with a graphic demonstration. In its colloidal form, iodine is one of the elements essential to the well-being of human cells. Yet if you drink as little as two or three grains of free iodine, it will kill you. Dr. Macy, when explaining this, held up an eight ounce cup full of colloidal iodine. "This cup holds the equivalent of 740 grains of free iodine - enough to kill 300 men." And he drank it. In its colloidal form iodine is not only harmless but beneficial. The same is true of arsenic and other deadly poisons. The wonders of colloidal chemistry are truly amazing, or as he said in conclusion, "The study of these phenomena constitutes the road to the ultimate in human knowledge."

CHEMISTRY'S MIRACULOUS COLLOIDS

Reprint from READERS DIGEST - March 1936

A group of executives sat tense and silent in an office in the RCA building in New York City. They stared with incredulous eyes at a purple orchid. AC short time before it had been rescued from a pile of debris, a withered, yellowed thing, . Now the petals were fresh and crisp, its colors vivid. It was blooming with new life, and would continue to do so for 16 or 17 days!

Dr. Frederick S. Macy, one of the country's outstanding bacteriologists, has added a teaspoonful of an amber-tinted liquid to the quart of water in the bottle which held the flower. Here was striking indication of the mysteries that ahead in that comparatively unexplored realm of science known as colloidal chemistry. It was one of innumerable experiments these gentlemen had been witnessing for a year or more, on behalf of their internationally known pharmaceutical company. A few days later they signed an 18 year contract for the rights to a solution similar to the one in Dr. Macy's bottle. They will invest more than $2,000,000 a year in it from now on.

To gain a working conception of what colloidal chemistry is, consider that living tissues and organs are simply great masses of cells - billions of them. The energy, the very life force of these cells, is obtained from certain minerals and metals, among them iron, iodine, manganese, copper. There are some 32, with traces of as many others, in the human body. Colloidal chemistry is the science which converts those elements into particles so minute that they can be utilized by living cells.

Normally, nature supps the cells with these elements in their colloidal form. Science has now learned to produce these colloids in the laboratory. "Lately, life has been prolonged by colloid action," says Dr. Macy, "and better knowledge of the subject will certainly result in prolonging the normal term of existence." In the case of the apparently orchid, copper in colloidal form was needed to restore the proper balance of the minerals and metals that comprised the life cells of the flower. Once that balance was restored, the cells began to function and the orchid lived again.

In the Colloidal Laboratories of America they have a motion picture which is as weird as anything ever shown on a screen - a movie of a headache. The actors are the nerves in a human head, magnified millions of times. You see the headache. Those nerve endings are tangled, twisting, writhing. Then you see the colloids enter. These rescuers, smaller than the blood corpuscles themselves, march straight to the spot where there is an unbalance of the vital metals. You see the nerves cease their twisting, relax, and assume their proper position.

Dr. Steinmetz, the wizard of electricity, devised a method of utilizing colloids in the treatment of sinus trouble. The Bide-Wee Home, New York's famous hospital for cats and dogs, can cure mange in three days, where it used to take three months. A large Midwestern city was freed from the scourge of goiter when colloidal iodine was added to the water supply. A famous institution for the treatment of alcoholism is experimenting with a colloidal solution which apparently not only overcomes the effects of excessive drinking, but removes the craving for liquor as well. Such treatment consists of the introduction of metals - gold and iodine, in the case of alcoholism - which correct the unbalance caused by alcoholic poisons.

The effect  of colloids is explainable in part by electric action. Sick and and broken down cells are attracted tot he colloids by electro-magnetic force, as iron filings are attracted to a magnet.  The colloids carry those decayed or poisonous substances into the blood stream, and they are eliminated, the system meanwhile adapting what it needs of the colloids.

A simple illustration will suggest the immense powers that are being unsealed. Suppose we have a cube iron measuring an inch on each edge. The total surface would be six square inches. The electrical charge is on the surface; therefore, the greater the surface, the greater the charge; and if we divide the cube of iron into smaller pieces we increase the surface areas. By colloidal chemistry that iron cube can be divided into particles so minute that they are invisible, hence instead of six square inches of surface emanating electric energy, we have something like 127 acres.

In colloidal form iodine, for example, is one of the elements essential to the well-being of human cells. Yet if you should drink as much as two or three grains of free iodine, it would kill you. Dr. Macy, when explaining this, held up an eight ounce cup full of colloidal iodine. "There," he said, "is the equivalent of 740 grains of free iodine - enough to kill 300 men." And he drank it. In that form iodine is not only harmless but beneficial. The same is true of arsenic and other ly poisons.

Colloidal chemistry was evolved by David Graham, a British chemist, 50 years ago, but only recently has it been realized even by scientists what an enormous influence it is destined to have in medicine, agriculture, industry.

"We have television now," one of the world's greatest scholars said recently. "There is, as I see it, just one great development left for our time. That is in the understanding of colloidal metals. It is the "Fourth Estate of Matter" the other three being land, water, and air."

Says Dr. Macy: "The study of these phenomena constitutes the road to the ultimate in human knowledge."

 


 


DEFINITIONS:

In Scotland in 1861, Thomas Graham coined the term colloid to describe Selmi's "pseudosolutions". The term emphasizes their low rate of diffusion and lack of crystallinity. Graham deduced that the low rate of diffusion implied that the particles were fairly large - at least 1nm in diameter in modern terms. On the other hand, the failure of particle sedimentation implied an upper size limit of 1 micrometer. Graham's definition of the range of particle sizes that characterize the colloidal domain is still widely used today. http://www.mpikg-golm.mpg.de/kc/what_is_a_colloid

The dull term colloid that reminds us of glue is, nevertheless, the accepted word.   The Father of Physical Chemistry, Thomas Graham (1805-1869), employed colloid to distinguish those materials in aqueous solution that would not pass through a parchment membrane from those that would. Glue was indeed a material that would not, and the Greek for glue is kolla, from which we also get "protocol" and "collagen." Those that would pass through were things like salt, and other soluble crystalline substances, which Graham called crystalloids.  http://www.du.edu/~jcalvert/phys/colloid.htm

Grolier's Multimedia Encyclopedia (version 8.01) states that: "The Colloidal State lies somewhere between a solution and a suspension." Colloidal minerals from humic shale are among the smallest crystalline particles known to exist, and are neither a suspension nor a solution. This gives these colloids some special properties that larger size colloids do not exhibit. Colloids larger than 0.005 microns have difficulty moving though plant and animal membranes. These colloids are hydrophobic in nature, meaning they have an inherent resistance to interaction with water. Examples in nature include: carbonates, sulfides, phosphates, framework silicates, aluminum, iron oxides, phyllosilicates, and some clays. http://minerallogic.com/safe.htt

According to the Schlumberger company a colloid is a finely divided, solid material, which when dispersed in a liquid medium, scatters a light beam and does not settle by gravity.  Such particles are usually less than 2 microns in diameter. Some drilling fluid materials become colloidal when used in a mud, such as bentonite clay, starch particles and many polymers. Oil muds contain colloidal emulsion droplets, organophilic clays and fatty-acid soap micelles. http://www.glossary.oilfield.slb.com/Display.cfm?Term=colloid

In Wikipedia we find:
In general, a colloid or colloidal dispersion is a substance with components of one or two phases, a type of mixture intermediate between a homogeneous mixture (also called a solution) and a heterogeneous mixture with properties also intermediate between the two. Typical membranes restrict the passage of dispersed colloidial particles more than they restrict the passage of dissolved ions or molecules; i.e. ions or molecules may diffuse through a membrane through which dispersed colloidal particles will not. The dispersed phase particles are largely affected by the surface chemistry existent in the colloid.
Many familiar substances, including butter, milk, cream, aerosols (fog, smog, smoke), asphalt, inks, paints, glues, and sea foam are colloids.  
The size of dispersed phase particles in a colloid range from one nanometer to one micrometer. Dispersions where the particle size is in this range are referred to as colloidal aerosols, colloidal emulsions, colloidal foams, or colloidal suspensions or dispersions. Colloids may be colored or translucent because of the Tyndall effect, which is the scattering of light by particles in the colloid.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colloids
 
A colloid is simply a fluid filled with lots of very small solid particles; this includes black ink, blood (filled with blood cells), and paint (filled with particles which stick to surfaces when they dry). Typically, these particles are very small, between 1 nm and 1000 nm (one-millionth to one-thousandth of a millimeter).
 http://www.deas.harvard.edu/projects/weitzlab/research/animglass.html
In actuality, “colloid” is a term commonly applied to any of a wide variety of substances besides glues and other sticky or gummy substances.  Alas, all are  deemed colloidal, i.e., somewhat similar in appearance and with general characteristics, and often exuded by or extracted from plants.  In this classification, however, many substances that are not true gums are included, among them many resins, so-called gum resins, and such substances as frankincense, myrrh, labdanum, copal, amber, chicle (“gum” in Spanish), and rubber (gum elastic, India rubber). 
True gums are complex organic substances mostly obtained from plants, some of which are soluble in water and others of which, although insoluble in water, swell up by absorbing large quantities of it. With water they form thick, gluey fluids. Their chemical nature is complex. In general, they contain in various proportions Carbon, Hydrogen, Oxygen, and such metals as Calcium, Magnesium, and Potassium in the form of salts of various organic acids. Gum arabic, or gum acacia, is a typical, water-soluble gum obtained from various plants of the genus Acacia, chiefly those found in Africa. A complex polysaccharide containing metal salts, gum arabic varies in color from white to red and is used extensively in making inks, adhesives, and confections; in the textile industry for filling fabrics; and in medicine as an emollient. Gum senegal is very similar. Among the gum resins (mixtures of gums and resins) are ammoniac, asafetida, bdellium, gamboge, and myrrh. See also tragacanth. http://www.bartleby.com/65/gu/gum.html

Clays are also well-known as colloids http://clays.org/journal/archive/volume%201/1-1-54.pdf

In that context, clay as member of the colloids, also fits the following description:
Colloidal clay: A colloid consists of one substance (or mixture of substances) very finely dispersed in another substance (or a mixture of substances) without a new true solution forming. So a colloid is a mixture of a dispersed phase and a continuous phase (disperse medium) BUT the dispersed phase is NOT dissolved in the continuous phase. 
•    A colloid is NOT a solution, although the colloid particles are not usually seen under a microscope, they are much bigger than molecules, and much bigger than the molecules of the continuous phase (disperse medium e.g. water). 
•    In a solution the solvent or solute particles are usually of comparable size and completely mixed at the 'individual particle level' i.e. completely homogeneous in the same phase. 
•    A colloid can be thought of as intermediate between a true solution and a mixture of e.g. a liquid and an insoluble solid. No filtration separation is possible with solutions and filtration is easy and effective with an insoluble solid. Similarly, most colloid particles are too small to be filtered, but separation from truly dissolved substances is possible with a membrane.
•    The colloidal particles of the disperse phase are equivalent to the solute of a solution and the continuous phase is equivalent to the solvent. The mixture is sometimes referred to as the 'colloidal solution'. These descriptors can be somewhat 'blurred' by the intermediate nature of colloidal systems!
The particles in a colloid are so small that they remain 'suspended' in the disperse medium (e.g. colloidal clay particles in water) with little tendency to settle out. However the colloidal particles are big enough for their surface area properties to be significant.
http://www.wpbschoolhouse.btinternet.co.uk/page01/AqueousChem/AqueousChem.htm#Colloidal%20clay


A related area and interesting one to the understanding of colloids is that of Soft condensed matter’ which is a newly-emerged sub-discipline of physics concerned with the study of colloidal suspensions, polymers, and surfactants (soap-like molecules).  (The term ‘soft matter’ was used by Pierre-Gilles de Gennes in his 1991 Nobel Physics Prize speech.) The behavior of these systems is dominated by one simple fact: they contain 'mesoscopic' structures with sizes between that of a typical small molecule such as water (~ 0.3 nm) and the beaker containing the liquid. These ‘mesoscopic’ structures (say, 10 nm to 1 micron) can be suspended solid particles or liquid drops, polymer coils formed by linking together tens of thousands of smaller molecular units, or ‘micelles’(www.montmorillonite.info pp. 10-11)  spontaneously formed by soap molecules trying to ‘hide’ their hydrophobic (water-hating) ‘tails’.
http://www.ph.ed.ac.uk/cmatter/soft.html


Humic acids are colloids and behave somewhat like clays [Senn, T. L. and Kingman, Alta R., 1973, A review of Humus and Humic Acids. Research Series No. 145 and 165, S. C. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Clemson, South Carolina.]

Another colloidal substance is humus.  http://foliarfert.com/pages/humus.htm  Its properties are generated in part by the workings of bacteria as they feed upon decomposing compost, generating humic acid and fulvic acid in the process.  However, according to at least one source, “The term colloids is being mistakenly used to refer to Fulvic Acid complexes, which are readily absorbable and in the perfect electrolyte form to react with cells.”  Since Fulvic acid is soluble in water while humic acid is not, this may be the correct view.  Nevertheless, whether a colloid or not, it is clear fulvic acid is found in conjunction with accepted colloidal substances and has some amazing properties of its own which no doubt contribute synergies to the metabolic process.  [http://www.msminerals.com/v200/include/FATMM.pdf]  

The general association of humus with clay and humic acid, all regarded as colloids, and as interdependent ingredients in soil texturizing, and mechanisms or structures that enhance bioavailability, and increase nutrition thereby, is a tantalizing one.  In that context it seems strange that anyone would overlook Montmorillonite (www.chelatedtraceminerals.com)  as a composite substance, and the ideal ingredient for any gardening or farming purpose.  It contains three distinct forms of colloids each of which brings nutrients to the equation, fulvic acid, chelated trace elements with catalytic properties, ions, other minerals, organic matter, water-retentive clay, and macro amounts of Silicon for plant structural strengthening.  Its application enjoys countless testimonials praising its success in increasing yields while serving as a remineralizer and pH balancer for future harvests, as well as corrective substance to prevent and remove blight.  Interestingly enough, these same complexes and substances within the Montmorillonite foster restorative health to foundered horses, as well as, accelerated growth and vitality to a wide variety of production livestock.  www.montmorillonite.org

The prevalence of colloids in Montmorillonite would seem to present a natural additive effect upon the nutritional process while remaining complementary to chelatitive transport and assimilation of ions in a balanced fashion.   www.montmorillonite.info


The most active clay group in terms of amount of ion exchange reactivity per unit weight of clay is the Montmorillonite family (www.montmorillonite.info, Dr. Aayesha Nasreen). The high degree of their base exchange capacity and the rapidity of their reactions have long been recognized as outstanding attributes of this class of clay minerals. Minerals of this group are plate shaped, three-layer lattice minerals with a very high degree of isomorphous substitution, distributed both in the octahedral positions in which chiefly magnesium substitutes for aluminum, and in the tetrahedral coordination in which predominantly aluminum substitutes for silicon [Harry, 1950; Hendricks, 1945; Koss and Hendricks, 1945]. Because of both the large base-exchange capacity and the widespread occurrence and economic importance of this group of minerals, a great deal of the experimental work has been done [Hauser, 1951]. http://clays.org/journal/archive/volume%201/1-1-54.pdf.

British physicist Martin Smalley in his book, Clay Swelling and Colloid Stability, summarizes the 21 experimental and 15 theoretical papers he has written on clays and colloids over the past couple of decades. The cornerstone of his account is his experimental investigations, mainly using neutron scattering, of the three-component clay-salt-water system composed of n-butylammonium vermiculite, n-butylammonium chloride, and water. For readers with a solid background in colloid physics and chemistry, he describes the process of experiment, interpretation, bewilderment, theory construction, and back to experiment that led to two paradigm shifts in colloid science. http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G1-151852801.html

Colloidal minerals is a curious term that is used by some to mean those minerals that occur in nature in a colloidal state. That is, they are minute particles that either are, or can be, easily dispersed in a medium such as water.  By this they are probably referring once again to “fulvic acid complexes.”  In that these are made up of such small particles, there is a major increase in surface area giving them greater exposure to the liquid or solvent they are to be distributed in. This results in increased solubility, bioavailability, absorption, and usefulness to the body.  What is usually intended by the foregoing is narrower interpretation meaning, plant-derived (colloidal) minerals.  The notion is that plant derived colloids containing minerals may provide the best of all forms of minerals not only because of their increased solubility, but also because they are associated with natural plant tissue. Many claims have been made about their superior bioavailability to simple, chelated minerals, and particularly metallic minerals (meaning more precisely, elements in a metallic state.)  http://www.northupfamily.com/Farms/Colloids.htm

Generally, we should think of “colloidal minerals” as the minerals trapped or transported by colloids whether derived from living plants or sediments forming largely by plant life.  The statement "Colloidal minerals are not bio-available" is only true when discussing hydrophobic minerals such as calcium carbonate, zinc oxide, or magnesium phosphates. These “chemical” colloidal minerals are poorly utilized due to the lack of fulvic acid. They require a chemical reaction caused by the body's enzymes and hydrochloric acid before they can be of any value to the body's cells. Since fulvic minerals extracted from humic/fulvic shale are chelated by fulvic acids, the statement "Colloids do not diffuse easily through plant or animal membranes" is not accurate.   Let’s examine why.

We have already seen in the foregoing text that the size of colloids varies greatly and there is a distinction between colloids formed in an organic environment and those which are classically inorganic. The conclusion that colloids cannot pass through membranes of vegetable and animal matter is based solely on studies and experiments done with inorganic colloids. These chemical colloids are much larger in particle size than naturally-occurring mineral colloids.  “Chemical” colloids were not chelated in nature by fulvic acids!http://www.minerallogic.com/safe.htt

Plants take minerals from the earth by their roots in ionic and colloidal form, and many are also capable of taking in minerals via their leaf membranes. Studies conducted using colloidal trace minerals in a foliar spray produced dramatic results in the health and growth rate of various plants.  It should be stressed living plant cells are capable of containing minerals in the colloidal form generated by the action of fulvic acid in the humus around the roots.  It has been amply demonstrated that minerals in colloidal form, lend themselves readily to uptake by roots and plant internal cellular absorption.  Diatoms are a form of algae (plant family) that created the bulk of the sedimentary clays from which similar colloidal substances and chelated minerals can be obtained in a natural balance.  The colloidal particle sizes from microscopic algae, are very small, indeed.

 
  Particles  0.002 mm in diameter
So-called “Fulvic colloids” recovered from sedimentary clays have particles with a diameter as small as 0.001 microns which pose no problem for absorption by modern plants’ tissues.  Thus, colloids containing numerous molecules per particle are often smaller than inorganic minerals that contain only one molecule (and nevertheless in their ionic form are also uptaken by roots).  The problem is then one of tissue absorption and toxicity.

An alternative way of explaining colloidal chemistry is that it is the science that studies the conversion of certain elements into particles so minute that they can be utilized by living cells.

The effect of colloids is explainable in part by electric action. Sick and dead and broken- down cells are attracted to the colloids such as clays by electro-magnetic force, just as iron filings are attracted to a magnet. The colloids carry those decayed or poisonous substances into the blood stream, where they are further conducted to organs involved with elimination, and excreted.  Meanwhile, the system selectively adapts individual elements it needs, obtained from the colloids.

In colloidal form, Iodine, for example, is one of the trace elements essential to the well-being of human cells. Yet if you should drink as much as two or three grains of free Iodine, it would kill you.   The story is told of a Dr. Macy, when explaining this, held up an eight ounce cup full of colloidal iodine. "There," he said, "This is the equivalent of 740 grains of free iodine -- enough to kill 300 men." And he drank it.  In that form Iodine was not only harmless but beneficial. The same is true of Arsenic, Selenium and other deadly poisons.  http://www.northupfamily.com/Farms/Colloids.htm Some of these in their transformed, or chelated and colloidal state as now referred to as the “essential poisons.”   

We thank Dr. W.P. Brown of the UK for these further examples of  colloids, and additional explanations:

i.e., the fine dispersion of one substance in another without a new solution forming: 
•    A sol is a solid dispersed in a liquid, e.g., tiny particles of clay in water. 
•    A foam is a gas dispersed in a liquid e.g. a well shaken soap solution or shaving cream foam.
•    An emulsion is a liquid dispersed in another liquid e.g. (i) milk (aqueous solution + insoluble, but dispersed fats), (ii) French dressing in salads (based on vinegar + olive oil, but these do reform the two oil/aqueous layers quite easily which is why they are shaken before use) and (iii) margarines contain emulsifiers to stop the salty water from separating out.
•    Colloidal particles may be electrically charged. (Note: So far the discussion has been confined to hydrophobic ('water hating') colloids which do NOT interact strongly with the continuous phase. In contrast 'gels' for example, are hydrophilic ('water liking') colloids, in which the colloid particles are very solvated (solvated means the particle is weakly attracted to layers of surrounding 'solvent' molecules of the dispersal medium e.g. water), and stabilised by the continuous phase). * 
•    Colloidal particles of a sol absorb ions, but not in electrically balanced proportions. Depending on which ion(s) are preferentially absorbed from the water, the net charge on the colloid particle can be positive or negative. The situation is complicated further because the charged colloid particles attract a sheath of oppositely charged ions around them. This is called the electrical double layer effect. This means neighbouring colloid particles have the same 'outer charge' and so are repelled, rather than attracted together. The sol itself is overall electrically neutral like any other solution.
•    Colloids are destroyed when the particles of the disperse phase join together and separate out from the continuous phase. This process is called coagulation. For sols, any disturbance of the double layer can cause coagulation to happen. It can be caused by boiling the sol, the increased random thermal collisions disturb the electrical balance and allows the colloid particles to collect together.
•    Sols are also very sensitive to the presence of ions, so any electrolyte ions present can affect the electrical double layer (the theory is complex but just think of the ions charge as affecting the stability of the double layer). The more highly charged the ion, the greater the electrical field force effect, so the greater its coagulating power. The ions reduce the repulsion between the colloid particles and allow coagulation to occur.
•    Examples of coagulating power: Al3+ > Mg2+ > Na+ or [Fe(CN)6]3- > SO42- > Cl-and this explains why aluminium sulphate Al2(SO4)3 is used to precipitate (coagulate) colloidal clay in water treatment.
http://www.wpbschoolhouse.btinternet.co.uk/page01/AqueousChem/AqueousChem.htm#Colloidal%20clay


 
So, what is all the fuss about colloids?  Why are the two camps, i.e, A) pro colloids -- Dr. Joel Wallach, et al., and B) colloids’ relevence in agriculture is a bunch of bunk -- with many vigorous opponents, divided so heatedly in a debate?

Perhaps this is due to overzealousness on the part of those who have an axe to grind, one way or another.  It is clear that those extracting nutrients, formulating fertilizers, quarrying soil amendments, synthesizing chemicals, and packaging and merchandising liquid minerals, vitamins, plant food, potting soils—you name it! -- are trying to hard sell what they have.  They talk about the upsides of their particular deposit or formula, but sadly, throw dirt on other people’s philosophies and livelihoods.   Are most of these extremists, well-intentioned, simply ignorant partisans, or is one group always lying, and the other group the only one capable of telling the truth?

From the research regurgitated on this website it appears that a strong case can be made for colloids having some importance, perhaps even serious value, in horticulture, agriculture, hydroponics and the like.  We all probably need to read more of the published research and think about things more studiously with an open mind.   Soil science is a complex field.  Another thing all of us should work on is getting the regulatory agencies in step with what is confirmed about chelation as an antidote to concerns about ppm of free heavy metals in supplements.  The precise role that colloids such as clays and their counterparts, fulvic acid and humic acid, play in rendering toxic substances impotent, needs to be grasped quickly before we have the remaining good topsoil so hopelessly impregnated with anti-friendly bacterial chemicals that drastic measures have to be undertaken to restore a little humus.

Kevin Trudeau should get a hold of this one.  He’d have a field day.

Many reports attest to the fact that our groceries have less nutritional value than they did a couple decades ago.  Just buying so-called organic food is not any panacea, but understanding organics and nutrition is.  We can make our organic food even more nutritious, and increase yields and productivity at the same time.

A number of links are provided throughout.  We hope you will take advantage of reading each website to which they direct you and the further sites linked to them in turn.  Go the library; check out a book; read some papers published in scientific journals.  It is difficult to make intelligent decisions unless one is properly educated.  Researching and writing this website and the others affiliated with it has been a great education for me.  I’m not resting on my laurels.  Heck, I’m just getting started!  How about you?

See also: www.montmorillonite.us

 

 

THOSE HUMIC SEA MINERALS
by Robert H. Faust published in ACRES U.S.A. 1986

 


Humic sea-mineral was discovered around the turn of the century near the town of Panaca, Nevada on what was once the coastal area of a giant inland sea that existed millions of years ago. The Great Salt Lake is a remnant of this sea. Mule skinners working for the railroad discovered one of their mules missing. They located it at the deposit eating the mineral.

 

'The mineral has been mislabeled montmorillonite, a common clay found throughout the region. It is actually a humic substance comprised of interbedded lake silt with high humus lignitic silts. The strata averages I inch to 4 inches thick. The organic matter is very fibrous and the pattern of kelp-like vegetation can be seen. The material tests out around 38% humus, along with high levels of potassium and iron. The material is found to a maximum height of 75 to 100 feet from the valley and is exposed due to an uplift. The area was once a vast inshore swamp and marsh abounding in the massive fern-like plants common in that period.

 

At one time, giantreptiles roamed the warm swamps. These animals were large yet had very small mouths. It is calculated that feeding on vegetation available in todays swamps they would not be able to sustain themselves even if they ate constantly. Therefore the food of the dinosaurs had to be of a food value unknown today. This once ultra-rich vegetation helped form what we call Soil-Min, a super concentrated compost layer many feet thick that was compressed into a layer only inches thick over millions of years. The swamps of this area had high levels of nutrients raining down from the volcanoes of central Utah. Later in geologic history the climate dried, and with it the swamps. During this time hundreds of feet of sediments built up. Later, as faulting occurred, the strata was inundated with geothermal fluids that mineralized the humus, then it was acted upon by unknown but beneficial fungi and bacteria. Cultures from the dry mineral were sent to the Communicable Disease Center in Atlanta, Georgia in 1978. The organism could not be identified, but it was non-pathogenic when tested.

 

The mined product called Soil-Min contains about 38% humus, 17% soluble silica, 5% potash, and 9% calcium. It contains nearly all trace elements.

 

A new theory first advanced by Dr. Graham Cairns-Smith of the University of Glasgow proposes that clay may hold the key to evolution, since it has several properties that would be needed to generate life. The two most important properties are the ability to store and. transfer energy. Clays have the ability to process inorganic raw materials into the more complex molecules from which the first life arose some four billion years ago. The clay crystals create the conditions by which it traps and holds energy for thousands of years. Research done in Germany by Armin Weiss of the University of Munich shows that clay can act as a catalyst in chemical reactions and may be capable of self-replication. Weiss reported in experiments he conducted that he observed reproduction of clay crystals from a parent clay to several generations of daughter clays. This finding adds evidence to the theories of Dr. Wilhelm Reich on "orgone energy." Reich said that "orgone" or cosmic energy when contained and directed at inorganic, sterile clay led to formation of "bions" which were a type of transitional organism between mineral and animal. The bions with continued exposure became a type of microorganism capable of reproduction. These theories were never accepted by the scientific community even though they were demonstrated experimentally to such high priests of science as Albert Einstein. As time goes on, more and more of Reich's theories will be likely accepted.

 


DO CLAYS REPRODUCE?
Clays "form" over rock, usually mineral rich rocks like granite. Anyone who has worked with soils has observed clays overlaying hard rock. Clay is more plastic near the rock surface and more granular near the soil surface. It has been said that rock "decomposes into clay," but I have never heard how very hard granite deep in airless, cold and sterile soil could decompose. Perhaps the new theories indicate that the clays actually reproduce, somehow using energy to feed off the "parent" rock. This underlying rock is called "parent material" by geologists. Perhaps by combining ancient humic clays with mineral soils, the clays "feed" on the minerals, producing daughter clays and "build the soils." Perhaps "orgone" energy is the energy source and perhaps some of the energy devices now used in agriculture somehow intensify this energy and stimulate this soil building process. Soil rich in organic matter can also build soil. Reich's "orgone" theory says that organic matter attracts and holds it. The orgone is then the energy source for microbial synthesis in the soil.

 


How can life come from energy and dead minerals? Deep sea exploration has proved that a whole food chain is supported near deep sea geothermal vents. This complex food chain is supported by a chemo-synthetic organism which derives its energy solely from sulfur. Perhaps this chemosynthesis is stimulated or energized by orgone energy which is also attracted and concentrated in water. Tube worms and strange fish live in water so deep that light has never reached there. The only energy is the heat from the geothermal water and sulfur compounds. There are also clay minerals in the water an perhaps on the sea bottom around the vents. So maybe life did spring from minerals and the energy of life is "orgone." l feel that the process that led to a deep sea food chain which includes six foot tube worms also is responsible for soil formation from dead minerals.

 


MODERN PRODUCTS
The benefits of the end product to agriculture are many. In general, when the material is fed to animals (including man) the digestion of food is increased and the absorption of food nutrients is increased. In plants, increased levels of trace minerals are noted. The humic acids and silica in what we now call Soil-Min can increase phosphate uptake. Silica can increase resistance to both insects and disease.

 


DR. DIKKER'S RESEARCH
Melchior Dikkers, Ph.D., a distinguished biochemist and mineral authority, wrote in his book The Trace Mineral Story that the mineral deposit was brought to his attention in 1931 when he was professor of bio and organic chemistry at Loyola University. Dr. Dikkers wrote that "The properties (of the deposit) were so amazing and unique that I became deeply involved in a research program that was to take me into many years of painstaking analysis and findings." Dr. Dikkers contended that deficiency disease comes about not only because of the insufficiency of a certain element, but also "As the result of an imbalance or disequilibrium between various mineral elements." He found that only a deposit such as the one in Nevada provided the needed proper balance of minerals and trace elements.

 

Nutra-Min is the feed supplementation form of the mineral for ruminants and non-ruminants, and for fish as well. It has proved to be both economical as well as useful as a feed supplement. Soil-Min as a fertilizer and soil conditioner has many benefits. It can be used preplant, side-dressed or with the seed at planting.

 

Many people have discovered or learned about the benefits of this geologically formed product in the many years since Dr. Dikkers did his work in 1931. The lesson is clear that trace minerals in an organic form (humic acids) are much more available and useful as trace element and major mineral nutrition sources. The principle of balance and new knowledge about the interactions of trace minerals again reinforces the concept of using a natural humic product with natural balance built in.
 

 

HUMIC ACIDS
Humic acids or humus can be defined as the end product of the decomposition of organic matter by aerobic organisms. Humic acids serve many complex purposes in the soil. Humic substances are a colloid and coat soil particles, acting as a cushion and an interface between the dead mineral of the soil and the living plant root. Without this coating the soil can become a gummy mass. With it, the soil becomes friable and granular in structure. These humic substances possess a high cation exchange capacity, which means that it helps hold the essential cation elements ammonium, potassium, calcium, et cetera. In the absence of the clay or humic colloid, the cations are either lost by fixation or leaching, and thereby they are lost to the plant root. Humic substances are very complex and are different depending on conditions and minerals available. Due to an inundation of geothermal fluids into this bed of humus, this product is unique, as it has high levels of attached cations, such as nearly 5% potassium.

 

In addition to the cations, the deposit contains very high levels of trace minerals in an organic form. That may be one of the keys to its beneficial properties. Plants and animals can absorb these elements readily in this humic form because it has already been assimilated and chelated by the microorganism which utilized parent organic matter eons ago. Trace elements are required in only minute amounts in this form. I know of no other natural product that has this mineral-organic makeup. That is what makes the bio-mineral fertilizer and feed supplement so unique.

 


http://www.humate.net/humicacid2.html

 


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